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How To Classify Pelvic Fractures, Part 2: Tile Classification

How to Classify Pelvic Fractures, Part 2: Tile Classification

Classification of Pelvic Fractures The two most common classifications of pelvic fractures are the Tile Classification and the Young-Burgess Classification. Tile Classification of Pelvic Fractures The Tile classification is based on stability. There are 3 major classifications: A (stable), B (rotationally unstable, vertically stable), and C (rotationally and vertically unstable). Tile A: Stable A1: fracture not involving the ring (avulsion…

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How To Classify Pelvic Fractures, Part 1: Young & Burgess

How to Classify Pelvic Fractures, Part 1: Young & Burgess

Classification of Pelvic Fractures The two most common classifications of pelvic fractures are the Tile Classification and the Young-Burgess Classification. Young and Burgess Classification of Pelvic Fractures The Young and Burgess classification is based on the direction of forces causing the fracture, severity of the injury and the resultant instability. It is based mostly on the initial A-P radiograph. There…

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How To Classify Acetabular Fractures

How to Classify Acetabular Fractures

Judet and Letournel Classification of Acetabular Fractures The Judet and Letournel classification is the most common and consistently used method to classify acetabular fractures. The acetabulum is made up of anterior and posterior columns of bone, which join together just above the acetabulum (supra-acetabular region). If you are looking at the face of the acetabulum, the columns resemble the Greek…

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Salter-Harris Fractures

Introduction Salter-Harris fractures are fractures that affect the growth plate in skeletally-immature patients.  Mnemonic There is a simple mnemonic that is often used to help remember the different types of Salter-Harris Fractures, using the letters S-A-L-T-R.  Letter Type Key Word  Description S I  Straight Across The fracture traverses through the cartilage of the physis. A II Above The fracture is…

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